weareeurovisiun:

The countries that appeared in only the 2013 or 2014 contest.

Eurovision Countdown: 16 days until the final [x]

eurovisionlol:

This is pathetic, EBU and DR…
If it worked that way then last year the CD should include ‘We Write The Story’ but it didn’t…
But of course, what a better promotion to Emmelie than to violently put her new single into the Eurovision 2014 Official CD which will be bought by thousands of fans? 
Stop it please, it’s tiring.

eurovisionlol:

This is pathetic, EBU and DR…

If it worked that way then last year the CD should include ‘We Write The Story’ but it didn’t…

But of course, what a better promotion to Emmelie than to violently put her new single into the Eurovision 2014 Official CD which will be bought by thousands of fans? 

Stop it please, it’s tiring.

make me choose:It's my life or Teardrops
esc things (countdown to eurovision week)
→ fire
in-the-calm-after-the-storm:

Someone had to do it

in-the-calm-after-the-storm:

Someone had to do it

Final Positions

anotherescsite:

Highest placing:
3rd; 1999: Raise nach Jerusalem - Surpiz for Germany
3rd; 2000: My star - Brainstorm for Latvia
3rd; 2008: Secret combination - Kalomira for Greece
Lowest placing:
24th; 2003: Hello from Mars - F.L.Y. for Latvia
Highest score:
218 points; 2008: Secret combination - Kalomira for Greece
Lowest score:
5 points; 2003: Hello from Mars - F.L.Y. for Latvia
Winners: None
Last place: None

Most visited country: Germany and Cyprus - 3 times each
Top ten finishes from #21 - 14 (of 27)

anotherescsite:

Highest placing:
1st; 1983: Se la vie est cadeau - Corinne Hermes for Luxembourg
1st; 1987: Hold me now - Johnny Logan for Ireland
1st; 2001: Everybody - Tanel Padar and Dave Benton for Estonia
1st; 2009: Fairytale - Alexander Rybak for Norway
Lowest placing:
22nd; 1989: Pad sem…

batnitt:

That’s it. That’s the competition.

Marie N

Dave & Tanel

Olsen Brothers

eurosong:

Today’s map looks at a concept that I like to call 12 pts diversity. Some nations are famous for nearly always giving their twelve points to one country (Cyprus, I’m looking at you), whilst other nations are more liable to have given 12s to a varied range of countries over the years. The higher the number of different countries you’ve awarded with your top score, perhaps the more diverse your nation’s voters tastes are - or perhaps, they are simply less beholden to neighbourly voting.
So, I looked back over 10 years of contests, in order to see which countries are more heterodox in their awarding of 12 points, and which countries fall back on awarding the top score to the same country or countries every time. There is one country whose 12-diversity is not accurately portrayed on the map - in 3 years, Italy has given its twelve to three different countries (Albania, Denmark and Romania) - but other than that, I feel it accurately represents how likely a country is to award top marks to a country outside of its pet list. Here are some observations I’ve made:
The Nordic countries are often criticised by “ah! Eurovision is so political” theorists who claim that these countries form a bloc that always awards the top marks to other countries in the super-cool and exclusive Nordic club. Not quite so, with some Nordic countries at least! Both Sweden and Finland have awarded 12s to 7 different countries over the course of 10 years. Out of that decade, they’ve both awarded Norway with 12 points thrice, and each other twice. But the other five years of 12s were given to non-Nordic countries.
The other Nordics aren’t quite so diverse… Norway has only once in 10 years awarded the twelve to a non-Nordic country, and that was to nearby Germany; Iceland’s only non-Nordic twelve was to Ukraine. whilst Denmark’s 2 twelve point forays were to Germany and Iceland.
Romania and Moldova: Keeping it in the family. Now that Athens must do without its guaranteed 12 points from Nicosia, the most incestuous, active 2-way voting relationship that remains in the ESC is that of Romania and Moldova. Romania have voted for their little brother on 7 out of 10 years, whilst Moldova have returned the favour for 7/9 occasions. Without taking into account previous patterns, there’s a 1/350 chance of two countries voting for one another seven times in the Eurovision. Chances are, it’ll be 8/11 this year if both countries pull through.
What’s particularly interesting is the diversity of choices in some of the extreme points of Europe compared to the uniformity of others. The Caucasus and Portugal don’t have the most diverse 12-awarding habits, whilst the two most diverse countries in the entire contest are in the southern extremities of the current ESC participatory sphere: Malta and Israel. They have given the twelve to eight different countries over 10 years, with Malta only ever having given the twelve more than once to one country (Azerbaijan for 3/10 years) and Israel to two (Sweden and Russia twice.)
Will we see typical 12s being awarded this year from the usual suspects - or some surprising top votes? We only have a few weeks left to find out!

eurosong:

Today’s map looks at a concept that I like to call 12 pts diversity. Some nations are famous for nearly always giving their twelve points to one country (Cyprus, I’m looking at you), whilst other nations are more liable to have given 12s to a varied range of countries over the years. The higher the number of different countries you’ve awarded with your top score, perhaps the more diverse your nation’s voters tastes are - or perhaps, they are simply less beholden to neighbourly voting.

So, I looked back over 10 years of contests, in order to see which countries are more heterodox in their awarding of 12 points, and which countries fall back on awarding the top score to the same country or countries every time. There is one country whose 12-diversity is not accurately portrayed on the map - in 3 years, Italy has given its twelve to three different countries (Albania, Denmark and Romania) - but other than that, I feel it accurately represents how likely a country is to award top marks to a country outside of its pet list. Here are some observations I’ve made:

The Nordic countries are often criticised by “ah! Eurovision is so political” theorists who claim that these countries form a bloc that always awards the top marks to other countries in the super-cool and exclusive Nordic club. Not quite so, with some Nordic countries at least! Both Sweden and Finland have awarded 12s to 7 different countries over the course of 10 years. Out of that decade, they’ve both awarded Norway with 12 points thrice, and each other twice. But the other five years of 12s were given to non-Nordic countries.

The other Nordics aren’t quite so diverse… Norway has only once in 10 years awarded the twelve to a non-Nordic country, and that was to nearby Germany; Iceland’s only non-Nordic twelve was to Ukraine. whilst Denmark’s 2 twelve point forays were to Germany and Iceland.

Romania and Moldova: Keeping it in the family. Now that Athens must do without its guaranteed 12 points from Nicosia, the most incestuous, active 2-way voting relationship that remains in the ESC is that of Romania and Moldova. Romania have voted for their little brother on 7 out of 10 years, whilst Moldova have returned the favour for 7/9 occasions. Without taking into account previous patterns, there’s a 1/350 chance of two countries voting for one another seven times in the Eurovision. Chances are, it’ll be 8/11 this year if both countries pull through.

What’s particularly interesting is the diversity of choices in some of the extreme points of Europe compared to the uniformity of others. The Caucasus and Portugal don’t have the most diverse 12-awarding habits, whilst the two most diverse countries in the entire contest are in the southern extremities of the current ESC participatory sphere: Malta and Israel. They have given the twelve to eight different countries over 10 years, with Malta only ever having given the twelve more than once to one country (Azerbaijan for 3/10 years) and Israel to two (Sweden and Russia twice.)

Will we see typical 12s being awarded this year from the usual suspects - or some surprising top votes? We only have a few weeks left to find out!

weareeurovisiun:

Costume changes are when the performer’s costume is adjusted, either by other performers, or themselves. Sometimes, such as in 1985, this isn’t known to the audience beforehand.

Eurovision Countdown: 17 days until the final [x]

emeochentaytres:

Mei Finegold - Same Heart
[ESC 2014] -  ישראל   إسرائيل Israel.

emeochentaytres:

Mei Finegold - Same Heart

[ESC 2014] -  ישראל   إسرائيل Israel.

anotherescsite:

Highest placing:
1st; 1990: Insieme: 1992 - Toto Cutugno for Italy
1st; 2005: My number one - Helena Paparizou for Greece
1st; 2011: Running Scared - Ell and Nikki for Azerbaijan
Lowest placing:
23rd; 2007: Flying the flag - Scooch for the United Kingdom
Highest score:
230…

Boo